Sodus Bay Has Enjoyed the Cleanest Water in a Decade!

TO CELEBRATE, Save Our Sodus Invites You and Yours to a Work Party & Expo

on September 17th, from 8-30 a.m. till 1 p.m. at the Sodus Point Beach

We are organizing this Work Party in conjunction with the 31st Annual New York State Beach Cleanup Day. 

The volunteer participants will clean the Sodus Point beach that so many of our residents and guests love and enjoy.

All Beach Cleanup participants in exchange for bags filled with the trash collected on the beach will be given tickets to a FREE meal. 

The meal will include Pulled Pork, Cole Slaw, Baked Beans, Mac Salad, Salt Potatoes, Soda and water, is sponsored by Save Our Sodus and provided by Captain Jack’s.

Work Party and Expo Itinerary

  • Beach Cleanup - From 8-30 a.m. till. 11-30 a.m.

    Beach Cleanup Volunteers (you?!) will be given special bags to be filled with trash collected on the beach. These filled bags will be turned in for an exchange to a FREE delicious lunch.

  • Expo - 8-30 a.m. till 11-30 a.m.

    This is where you can learn What Worked, and What Else We Can Do to make sure Sodus Bay’s water stays clean.

  • Lunch and Party

    Pulled Pork, Cole Slaw, Baked Beans, Mac Salad, Salt Potatoes, Soda and water will be FREE to the Beach Cleanup participants. Captain Jack’s will be providing and serving it.

IF you enjoyed your summer on Sodus Bay, YOU WILL FEEL GREAT joining our Work Party and Expo!

Please COME, BRING YOUR FRIENDS AND KIDS. 

Hot, dry summers, like the one we are having here in the Upstate New York, often come with toxic blue-green algae blooms.

Dr. Greg Boyer from SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) and his team monitor water quality of Sodus Bay weekly. Here’s what he shared with us during his resent sample collection around the bay.

Save Our Sodus (SOS) 2016 Annual Fundraising Campaign

Our Mission Statement:

To Preserve, Protect and Improve Great Sodus Bay

SOS is a non-profit organization. Members of the board of directors, listed below, serve on a voluntary basis:

 Dave McDowell (president) Dave Parker, Chris Tertinek, Mike Virts, Dave Scudder, Sue Bassage, Tom Yale, Jim Gocker, Ed Leroux, Kevin Mullaney, Dan McCullough

Our Accomplishments:

  • Purchased stream instrumentation to monitor harmful contaminants entering the Bay

  • On-going data gathering from Bay buoys to anticipate the emergence of blue/green algae

  • Participate in wetland restoration of Sodus Bay tributaries to minimize contaminants entering the Bay

  • Continue to strongly oppose the International Joint Commission Plan 2014;

  • Coordinate annual water chestnut pull and identification of other invasive species;

  • Facilitate shoreline restoration repairs to the east-west breakwater that protects Sodus Bay

  • Partner with SUNY ESF, Wayne County Soil and Water, Nature Conservancy and others

In order to continue with our mission, your financial help would be appreciated. SOS is a 501C3 organization. Contributions are tax deductible to the extent allowable by law.

YES, I WANT TO SUPPORT SOS NOW

TO DONATE BY CHECK,

Please make the check payable to Save Our Sodus and send it to:

Save Our Sodus PO Box 424 Alton, N.Y. 14413

Attention Sodus Bay residents and guests:

A very slight toxic bloom near the shore of Oak Park Marina was recorded last week.

As a precaution it is recommended that people and pets avoid contact with visible algae.

Please click on a link to open a report prepared by SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Sodus Bay Blue-Green-Algae Report 07.29.16  (a pdf file)

If you would like to request a visual and blue-green algae toxin analysis at SUNY ESF you can submit a sample with a filled-out request form.

Click to download Request Form

Data Collection Instruments in the Bay

Save Our Sodus (SOS) has purchased data collection instruments that monitor the water quality of the Bay. The data can provide us and our partners at SUNY ESF with information that we can possibly predict when blue/green algae might appear. If you are out in the Bay you will see the monitoring instruments at various locations on the Bay.

The blooms appear when the organism multiplies very rapidly over a short period of time, usually in calm, warm water.

Blue-green algae is concerning because has toxins when there is a high level of algae in the water. Contact with it may result in side effects including itching, rashes, fever, headache, upper respiratory symptoms, vomiting and diarrhea.

People are advised to not drink or use the lake water for cooking; any swimming, wading or other forms of direct contact with water containing blue-green algae should be avoided. Pets should also be kept away from the water.

DONATE TODAY

We Need Your Support

SOS relies solely on donations from stakeholders in the effort to Preserve, Protect and Improve Great Sodus Bay. Please join us in making Sodus Bay the Great Bay that it is – DONATE!

READ Sodus Bay Algal Bloom Q & A prepared by Wayne County Emergency Management Office

CLICK to read Q&A Document

On July 25th, Saturday,  15 volunteers from SOS, Wayne County Soil & Water from  Hilary Mosher’s team paddled to the Second Creek to harvest water chestnuts, an invasive specie to Sodus Bay.

For those that don’t know – Hillary Mosher is Director of the Finger Lakes Institute in Geneva. She is also chairperson of the Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISM).  As such she is charged with finding and eradicating all invasive species in the region. She has a very small budget and relies on groups like Save Our Sodus to get things done.

Some volunteers have been doing it a number of years. Based on their observation, this year’s harvest wasn’t as bountiful as in the previous years – WHICH IS A GREAT THING!

The weather was sunny, albeit a bit windy. The water was warm and everybody had a lot of fun pulling out water chestnuts.

 Beautiful Water lilies, Pickerel weed, and small white flowers that looked like aquatic violets cheered our volunteers.

Some photos from that expedition are below. You can click them to enlarge.

Our next pull is at the Sodus Bay Bridge.

Please COME on July 30th  from 9 a.m. till noon. Bring sun-tan lotion and a FRIEND!

Have you seen buoys around Sodus Bay? They help predict toxic algae blooms. SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) monitors water quality of the Bay. Watch this video to learn more.


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A crisp, clear spring morning when sunlight sparkles off the water might seem like an odd time to think about toxic algal blooms that coat the water in a thick blue-green film, but it’s precisely when researchers start water monitoring.

Toxic blue-green algal blooms in the northeastern United States typically form during the hot days of August. By keeping an eye on the water chemistry throughout the summer, researchers might be able to predict when a potential bloom is coming.

Michael Satchwell, senior research support specialist at ESF, and undergraduate Matt Blake deployed three buoys in Sodus Bay in early May to monitor water conditions in the bay. The solar-powered buoys measure the basic water chemistry, including temperature, pH, conductivity and dissolved oxygen levels, chlorophyll and phycocyanin, a pigment specific to blue-green algae. The central buoy houses a complete weather station and also records water levels. This data is being used to produce models of water movement within the bay.

“If we see a spike in phycocyanin levels we know a potential bloom may be coming,” said Satchwell. Data from the buoys is transmitted in near-real time to the Great Lakes Research Consortium’s website where anyone can access the data. It is also being used by researchers at the University of Buffalo to build a better predictive model for the occurrence of harmful algal blooms.

“If we get them (blue-green algal blooms), we get them typically in the late summer,” said Ed Leroux, a resident of Sodus Bay who assists the ESF team.

The bay experienced a major bloom in 2010 that shut down businesses two weeks before Labor Day, delivering a blow to the popular tourist area. “No one was in the water, no one was in the restaurants,” Leroux said. “It woke the community up. We had to find out why it happened and how it happened because it had a serious economic impact on the community.”

Blue-green algae blooms, or cyanobacteria, can be harmful to humans and fatal to pets. Exposure to the algae can result in diarrhea, nausea or vomiting; skin, eye or throat irritation; and allergic reactions or breathing difficulties.

Save Our Sodus, a group dedicated to addressing challenges to the quality of Sodus Bay, asked Dr. Greg Boyer of the ESF Department of Chemistry to look into the matter. Boyer, director of the Great Lakes Research Consortium and member of Save Our Sodus, has studied algal blooms in numerous water bodies in the Northeast and China for more than three decades.

Boyer began random water sampling in the bay in 2011 and has been collecting data, sometimes on a weekly basis every since. This information forms the basis of a weekly report that appears on the Save our Sodus website to inform the general public about conditions on the bay. The buoys were installed in 2011 to automate the process with funding from a number of sources, including a grant with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through the Great Lakes Restoration initiative, New York Sea Grant and funding from the Great Lakes Observing System.

“To date, data shows chlorophyll has dropped off while phosphorus levels vary up and down, and toxicity is down; but that doesn’t necessarily mean things are getting better. Phosphorus levels have to be in check and we have to be able to predict the toxicity levels,” said Boyer.

Blooms are known to form in tight corners and areas with little water circulation, such as marinas, so the town installed blowers – normally used to keep ice from forming – to help keep the water moving in the summer, Leroux said.

So far, researchers have not identified a “smoking gun” that identifies what precisely triggers the toxic blooms. However work with the University of Buffalo strongly suggests that water movement in and out of the bay may be an important contributor.

Fortunately for the merchants and tourists in Sodus Bay, algal blooms have not been troublesome over the last few years. “There hasn’t been a significant bloom since 2010,” noted Satchwell.
“If you keep studying it, it won’t come back,” Leroux said, somewhat tongue in cheek. “So we’re going to study it to death.”

~~~~~~~ The story first appeared at http://www.esf.edu/communications/view.asp?newsID=5361 ~~~~~~~~~~

We need your help at the Sodus Bay Annual Water Chestnut Pull

Please join other volunteers at our Sodus Bay Annual Water Chestnut Hand Pull which takes place on

TWO DATES:   July 23d and July 30th  9 a.m. – noon;

at THREE LOCATIONS:

  • Emerald Point of the Second Creek (July 23d); 
  • Clark Creek & Spiegel Drive  (July 23d)
  • Sodus Bay at the Bay Bridge (July 30th)

Please help remove this invasive species from Sodus Bay - Come and BRING FRIENDS!

SOS Board member Dan McCullough harvested 6 bags of immature water chestnuts at the old trestle marina last week. This site will need to be revisited later this month as some weeds were inaccessible due to docks and large boats. Dan did a lot of outreach with boaters.  We will provide them with some invasive species materials at that visit so that they know what they’re looking at!

  • WHAT

    Sodus Bay Annual Water Chestnut Pull –

    Each year volunteers help with a water chestnut hand-pull harvest. In July helpers turn out in canoes and kayaks

  • WHY

    The water chestnut is an invasive plant that can clog waterways, cause fish kills, tangle up boats and lower the value of shoreline property. To help with the effort to control aquatic invasive species we pull them out because these plants grow very rapidly and if not managed, they out-compete native aquatic vegetation and form impenetrable floating mats on water surace.

    These mats create a hazard for boaters. The density of the mats can severely limit light penetration into the water and reduce or eliminate the growth of native aquatic plants beneath the canopy.

    The reduced plant growth combined with the decomposition of the water chestnut plants which die back each year can result in reduced levels of dissolved oxygen in the water, impact other aquatic organisms, and potentially lead to fish kills.

    Another effect of dense populations of water chestnut is the migration of small fish from under the canopy to the edges of the vegetative mat. That in turn leads to concentration of larger game fish attracted to the veritable “smorgasbord” at the fringe.

  • WHEN

    July 23, SATURDAY – from 9 a.m. till noon  – Emerald Point of the Second Creek 

    July 23, SATURDAY – from 9 a.m. till noon – Clark Creek & Spiegel Drive  

    July 30, Saturday, from 9 a.m. till noon – at the Bay Bridge

  • WHERE

    Emerald Point of the SECOND CREEK – Use an orange weed harvesting machine as the landmark –  July 23, Saturday, from 9 a.m. till noon

    CLARK Creek & Spiegel Drive – July 23, Saturday, from 9 a.m. till noon

    The BAY BRIDGE – July 30, Saturday, from 9 a.m. till noon

DEC Seeks Help from Anglers in Preventing Spread

The invasive algae didymo (Didymosphenia geminata) was recently confirmed in Clear Creek, a popular trout fishing stream in Cattaraugus and Wyoming counties, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reported today.

“This is the first documented finding of this aquatic nuisance species west of the Catskills in New York State,” said DEC Region 9 Director Abby Snyder. “Clear Creek is one of our region’s most popular wild brown and rainbow trout streams. Given its connectivity to Cattaraugus Creek and proximity to other nearby trout streams, we ask anglers to be especially vigilant in helping to prevent this species from spreading.”

Samples taken and examined by DEC recently confirmed the algae’s presence in Clear Creek at Jones Road in the Cattaraugus County portion of the steam. The finding was confirmed after a concerned angler contacted DEC with a potential sighting.

Didymo, also known as “rock snot,” can produce large amounts of stalk material that form thick mats on stream bottoms. During blooms, these mats may completely cover long stretches of stream beds. Its growth can alter stream conditions, choking out many of the organisms that live on the stream bottom. The resulting disturbance to the stream’s food chain can negatively impact trout and other fish populations.

Once introduced to an area, didymo can rapidly spread to nearby streams. Wading anglers and other water recreationalists such as kayakers, canoeists, boaters and jet skiers can easily and unknowingly spread didymo by transporting the cells on boats and other gear, especially if moving from one waterway to another in a single day.

DEC strongly encourages all anglers and boaters in the region to play a role in preventing the spread of didymo by following the precautions below:

  • Check

    Before leaving a river or stream, remove all obvious clumps of algae and look for hidden clumps. Leave them at the affected site. If you find any later, do not wash them down drains; dispose all material in the trash.

  • Clean

    Treatment varies depending on what needs to be cleaned. Be sure that the solution completely penetrates thick absorbent items such as felt-soled waders and wading boots. Felt-soles, due to their ability to absorb didymo cells and to stay damp for prolonged periods of time, are a major vector in spreading didymo and require special treatment (prolonged soaking in disinfectant).

  • Dry

    If cleaning is not practical, after the item is completely dry to the touch, wait an additional 48 hours before contact or use in any other waterway. Check thick, absorbent items closely to assure that they are dry throughout. Equipment and gear can also be placed in a freezer until all moisture is frozen solid. NOTE: If cleaning, drying or freezing is not practical, restrict equipment to a single water body.

DEC Fisheries staff will monitor Clear Creek and nearby waterways throughout the summer to check for the spread of this algae, and encourages anglers to report any potential didymo sightings and locations. For more information on didymo, visit DEC’s website.

At the end of June, 2016 blue-green algae was spotted at the south end of Conesus Lake, according to the Livingston County Department of Health.

Blooms of potentially toxic blue-green algae are continuing to pop up along the eastern shore of Conesus Lake.

The Livingston County Department of Health warned  that algal blooms, possibly accompanied by harmful toxins, have been observed at various locations on the eastern shore of the lake, located about 20 miles south of Rochester.

Since then the problem has spread, with blooms appearing and dying off in a number of spots.

End of June is earlier than normal for blue/green algae bloom in our region.

With warm weather algae blooms are showing up at the Second Creek and other areas of Sodus Bay.

If you would like to request a visual and blue-green algae toxin analysis at SUNY ESF you can submit a sample with a filled-out request form.

Click to download Request Form

Data Collection Instruments in the Bay

Save Our Sodus (SOS) has purchased data collection instruments that monitor the water quality of the Bay. The data can provide us and our partners at SUNY ESF with information that we can possibly predict when blue/green algae might appear. If you are out in the Bay you will see the monitoring instruments at various locations on the Bay.

Algae Blooms on Sodus Bay 7-5-16

Non-toxic algae bloom, Second Creek, Sodus Bay, July 3, 2016

To date, none of our weekly samples have shown any b/lue-green algae.

The blooms appear when the organism multiplies very rapidly over a short period of time, usually in calm, warm water.

Blue-green algae is concerning because has toxins when there is a high level of algae in the water. Contact with it may result in side effects including itching, rashes, fever, headache, upper respiratory symptoms, vomiting and diarrhea.

People are advised to not drink or use the lake water for cooking; any swimming, wading or other forms of direct contact with water containing blue-green algae should be avoided. Pets should also be kept away from the water.

DONATE TODAY

We Need Your Support

SOS relies solely on donations from stakeholders in the effort to Preserve, Protect and Improve Great Sodus Bay. Please join us in making Sodus Bay the Great Bay that it is – DONATE!

READ Sodus Bay Algal Bloom Q & A prepared by Wayne County Emergency Management Office

Click to Read Q&A Document

 

After April 2016 Storm on Sodus Bay and Lake Ontario, which caused a BREACH between Charles Point and Crescent Beach, SOS has made a few videos showing the breach and the alarming conditions of the East Breakwall.

The videos are arranged in a playlist and will play one after another.

Sodus Bay Shoreline Maintenance is Vital for the Bay

Both the breach and the East breakwall conditions underscored  the importance of maintaining Shoreline Resiliency if the Bay is to remain the BAY and not become a part of Lake Ontario.

Since the initial videos were published, SOS has discovered that in 1986 a Study was conducted by the Army Corp of Engineers which was followed up by a report 1988. Watch the video below where Dave McDowell, President of SOS discusses it and talks about the next steps.

The army Corp has estimated that they need $250,000 for the Design of the East Breakwall Restoration project and has been requesting the money in their annual budget requests to Congress for at least the last 4 years.

These moneys have not been appropriated by the Congress yet.

Our contribution of $125,000

Our contribution of $125,000 in cash would help ensure the project gets underway quickly. We have no time to waste because the devastation that will be caused by the failure of the breakwall will be significantly more costly to remediate.

Do you CARE about Sodus Bay? Please DONATE to East Breakwall Restoration TODAY!

CLICK HERE TO DONATE

After we published the videos about the breach and the condition of the East Breakwall on Facebook, a few people asked: Why Do We Need East Break Wall and Sand Bar? Good question! Dave McDowell, President of Save Our Sodus, answers it in this video. Please watch, share, support.

In case you haven’t seen our video showing the condition of the East Breakwall in Sodus Bay, please watch it below, share and support us.

A lot of Sodus Bay summer residents and fans were away at a time we had a major storm on April 3-4 of 2016. You can read about it in this post and watch the video below that we recorded a few weeks later.

Not much that we are aware of, and that was the reason we wanted to make the videos in the first place. Watch Ed Leroux, former SOS President share it with you in the video below.

The SHORT answer to that question is two-fold.

1. The Breach is on the private property and Breakwall is on the public property.

2. There has been a push for the East Breakwall restoration during the last four years. We believe that us coming together as a concerned community and raising initial money for the Design of the Restoration of the East Breakwall would STIMULATE the project and expedite it significantly.